Sunday, August 30, 2015

Ericsson shows off first 5G handset - but it is so big it comes with its own cart to move around

Well, it’s technically a mobile: Ericsson shows off first 5G handset - but it is so big it comes with its own cart to move around

  • Most industry experts claim 5G will be up and running by 2020
  • Earlier this year, Ericsson tested its device in Texas and Stockholm
  • It can reach speeds of 2 Gbps, which is around 10 times faster than 4G 
Earlier this year Ericsson began testing a 5G device in Stockholm, Sweden and Plano, Texas
Earlier this year Ericsson began testing a 5G device in Stockholm, Sweden and Plano, Texas
Intel recently dubbed 5G the 'fusion of all of the wireless technology'.
It claims it is the next big revolution in technology, driving the development of everything from connected cars to fast mobile technology and human augmentation.
Most in the industry expect 5Gwill be up and running by 2020.
And they are closer than ever to that goal. Earlier this year Ericsson began testing out a new 5G device on the streets of Stockholm, Sweden and Plano, Texas.
But it wasn't your ordinary mobile. While it is outperforming every 4G phone on the market today, the device is so large it has to be transported on a cart.
According to Fortune, Ericsson's 5G prototype is so big because it is still a testbed designed to be used as a tablet, smartphone or PC.
The can reach speeds of 2 Gbps, which is ten times faster than the 200 Mbps speeds available on many 4G networks.
'The question is how do we make a system that can connect a whole continent at 10 to 20 Mbps?' Håkan Andersson, a tech researcher at Ericsson told Fortune.
The world's wireless will also have to decide what 5G needs to do that the current, fourth generation of wireless networks will never offer.
'It is unclear what the opportunity or weakness that 5G should address is,' researchers at GSMA, the global trade group of mobile network operators, said in a report issued in December that punctured some of the more visionary claims for 5G.
With discussions on setting 5G technical standards yet to begin, a final standard is expected in 2019, experts say.
That will not stop network equipment, such as Ericsson, from touting projects as ready for 5G.
While it is outperforming every 4G phone on the market today, the device is so large it has to be transported on a cart. Pictured is, Ericsson vice president Sara Mazur posing next to the 5G device
While it is outperforming every 4G phone on the market today, the device is so large it has to be transported on a cart. Pictured is, Ericsson vice president Sara Mazur posing next to the 5G device

NOKIA'S 5G TECHNOLOGY IS 40 TIMES FASTER THAN 4G 

Networks across the globe are still working on the roll out of 4G, but that hasn't stopped them trying to make our mobile internet even faster for the next-generation of devices.
At a summit in Boston in April, Nokia Networks demonstrated a system that can deliver speeds of up to 10 Gigabits per second (Gbps).
This is 40 times faster than the current maximum speeds achievable on 4G and means full-length HD films could be downloaded in the blink of an eye. 
Such speeds could also pave the way for next-generation video and pictures on 8K - twice as clear as 4K and 16 times as clear as HD - as well as reduce the lag on video calls. 
Nokia Networks teamed up with National Instruments (NI) to build what it's calling the fastest cellular technology ever tested. It sends data over a frequency of 73,000 MHz, or 73GHz.
Wavelengths in this band can be as small as millimetre, and are also known as millimetre wave or mmW and are currently used by radio astronomy, radars on aircraft and security scanners in airports, for example.
By comparison, current mobile networks range between 700 MHz and 3,500 MHz, while the maximum theoretical speeds for 4G is 42Mbps.
The Nokia Networks system is 10 times faster than the current fastest fibre internet technology, including Google Fiber in the US. 
Most industry experts expect the first commercial deployments of 5G in the run-up to the Tokyo Olympics in 2020.
'What happens before that is a lot of marketing,' Lauri Oksanen, vice president of research and technology at Nokia's Networks business.
The technology will have to grapple with a new challenge: the fact that much of the world's spectrum in lower frequency bands is used up.
What remains is higher frequency spectrum that can only carry traffic over shorter distances.
The biggest thing that works in this spectrum is small things, lots and lots of connected things operating in close proximity.
This spectrum will fuel the so-called 'Internet of Things', the biggest big idea justifying the upgrade to 5G.
'In the future we see a world where everything that can be connected, will be connected. And that is virtually everything,' says Sara Mazur, Ericsson's head of research.
Overall, Ericsson has forecast 50 billion connected objects by 2020, and it claims 5G will be the driving force behind them.
Most industry experts expect the first commercial deployments of 5G in the run-up to the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. 'What happens before that is a lot of marketing,' Lauri Oksanen, vice president of research and technology at Nokia's Networks business.
Most industry experts expect the first commercial deployments of 5G in the run-up to the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. 'What happens before that is a lot of marketing,' Lauri Oksanen, vice president of research and technology at Nokia's Networks business.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3214880/Well-s-technically-mobile-Ericsson-shows-5G-handset-big-comes-cart-around.html#ixzz3kNhI1u1E